Family Whitepaper

By Pete Molloy – A former high profile father’s rights activist with Fathers 4 Justice and architect of the British National Party’s White Paper on family policy.

The experience I have in English family law is spending 7 years going through the family courts for the right to have my children have their loving father in their lives and ended up with being awarded with “indirect” contact by way of letters, 2 years as a father’s rights activist with Fathers 4 Justice and studying law at Liverpool John Moores University. All this experience has led me to write up the British National Party’s White Paper on family policy entitled Promoting the Traditional Family Unit.I welcome the news that the coalition government is going to change the law to allow fathers who have been unlawfully removed from their children’s lives by the child’s mother with the co-operation of the mother’s, sorry, family courts, to a meaningful relationship with their child in the event of a relationship breakdown, but I fear things may not change.

The current legislation that governs whether a parent can have contact with their own child in the event of a relationship breakdown is the Children Act 1989, which was brought in under a Conservative government.

The amount of fathers losing contact with their children was exacerbated when the anti-traditional family unit Marxist Labour Party came to power in 1997 and were in league with militant feminists to destroy the traditional family unit by permanently wanting to remove the father.   

Under this piece of legislation all rights were removed from the parents and given to the child under the “best interest of the child” principle. It is this very principle that is the problem with the current legislation since there is no legal definition of what is in the best interest of the child and the principal is manipulated to be construed to what is in the best interests of the mother. Therefore, it is this principle that needs to be defined, because if a child had been “got at” by their mother or other family members to inform the family court that they no longer wish to have direct contact with their father then the judge will not go against the child’s wishes, because in doing so would not be acting in the best interests of the child.

How would fathers who have been unlawfully removed from their child’s life benefit under a British National Party government?

A British National Party government would introduce a legal definition to the “best interest of the child” principle, which would be:
In the event of a relationship breakdown it is in the child’s best interest that the child maintains a loving relationship via direct contact (parenting time) with both parents unless there is a lawful reason why that relationship cannot continue.

Having a legal definition will prevent children from losing contact with their fathers and will result in the child maintaining a loving relationship with both parents, which truly as to be acting in the child’s best interest.